How do you rate this laptop with Linux?
Excellent
 
9% (2)
Good
 
59% (13)
Fair
 
9% (2)
Poor
 
23% (5)
Unusable
0% (0)

Acer Aspire One 725

Introduction

The latest in the Aspire One 700 family. It has been available with a C-60 apu for some time, and now a new model with C-70 apu is also available. The price on the C-60 models has come down accordingly, making it a bargain in many cases.

This page is just for discussing using Linux on the Acer Aspire One 725. For a general discussion about this laptop you can visit the Acer Aspire One 725 page on LapWik.

Editing This Page

If you would like to edit this page please first view our Editing Guidelines.

Specifications

For full specifications see the Acer Aspire One 725 specifications page.

NameAcer Aspire One 725
ProcessorAMD C-Series dual-core processor C-60/C-70* (1 MB L2 cache, 1 GHz with Turbo CORE Technology up to 1.33 GHz)
Screen11.6“ HD 1366 x 768 resolution, high-brightness (200-nit) Acer CineCrystal LED-backlit TFT LCD
RAMUp to 4 GB
HDD320/500 or larger hard disk drive(depending on the model)
Optical DriveNo, External USB ODD (optional)
GraphicsAMD Radeon HD 6290/7290*
NetworkRJ-45 port
Acer InviLink Nplify 802.11b/g/n
Broadcom 4313
USBNewest models have one USB 3.0 port and two USB 2.0 ports

* C-60+HD 6290/C-70+HD 7290 varies with models.

Linux Compatibility

DeviceCompatibilityComments
ProcessorOK
ScreenOKBrightness controls may not work
HDDOK
Graphics ChipOK
VGA OutOK
HDMI OutOK
SoundOK
MicrophoneOK
Headphone PortOK
Microphone-In PortNot TestedCombined with Headphone port.
EthernetOK
WirelessOK
BluetoothAlmost OKMay temporarily require Windows to enable.
WWANNot Tested
USBOK
Card ReaderOK
WebcamOK
KeyboardOK
TouchPadAlmost OKHit Fn-F7 before logging in – see https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1058346
Suspend/ResumeOK

Touchpad

Some reported that the touchpad doesn't work, in which case hitting Fn+F7 before login. However, it natively works with Debian Wheezy with its native kernel 3.2.0.

Linux 3.8.2

As Linux 3.2.0 didn't seem to suffice this laptop, I decided to give 3.8.2 a try. First and foremost, I compiled my own kernel, so installing a pre-built kernel may not get desired results. Here's my config (gzip'd), but I have many things disabled as it is unclean with things still enabled, and should only really be used for reference. This contains all the modifications that are listed below.

This shall be updated as I find out things.

Backlight

The backlight largely works with 3.8.2.

X may do a full-screen flash whenever brightness up/down keys are pressed. looking at acpi_listen's output, hitting the brightness down button yields not one but two results:

video/brightnessdown BRTDN 00000087 00000000

and

video/switchmode VMOD 00000080 00000000 K

Remembering from research I did prior, many users had problems with laptop WMI extras, so I disabled CONFIG_ACER_WMI in the kernel's config, which fixed the problem
This will only work for the radeon driver; it won't fix fglrx's equivalence.

Fglrx's version seems to be unresolvable. Until I (or someone) finds a proper method to disable the switchmode event on the brightness, I suggest adding this to your xorg.conf:

Section "InputClass"
        Identifier      "Video Bus"
        MatchProduct    "Video Bus"
        Option          "Ignore" "on"
EndSection

What this does it that it makes X11 ignore the input from the video bus, which is, among other things, responsible for sending ACPI events to userspace. And from this, screen will stop flashing when brightness is changed, but you won't get the cute event popups anymore. (Fortunately, this a cover-all, and will allow the cute acpi events from acer-wmi, without the flashing)

Moreover, if using the radeon driver (not fglrx/catalyst), there's a special file,

/sys/class/backlight/radeon_bl0/brightness

which can be used for a more fine brightness adjust.
Valid numbers for this are 0-255, where 0 turns off the backlight and 255 is the brightest possible.

Bluetooth

Although I cheated and enabled it in Windows before I started all of this, something tells me that

CONFIG_ATH9K_BTCOEX_SUPPORT

is needed to be enabled to turn on bluetooth in linux, but I may be wrong.

CONFIG_BT_HCIUART_ATH3K thinks that it is needed, may actually do something, can't figure out what.

amd-v/svm

!!! This is firmware settings modification; the standard caution and risks still apply here. !!!
For the most part I followed this, however mine was a bit different. For the sake of simplicity, I'm going to repeat what was said on that thread.

module efivars is needed:

# modprobe efivars

Mount the efi virtual filesystem so we can edit the config:

# mount none /sys/firmware/efi/efivars -t efivarfs

Now, the config file we're interested in is in /sys/firmware/efi/efivars, and has the name that begins with 'Setup-'. Your Setup's name will be different from mine, as the rest of the name is a GUID.
(This is my Setup with the bit already flipped)

# hexdump -C Setup-a04a27f4-df00-4d42-b552-39511302113d
00000000  07 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000010  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
00000030  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00  |................|
00000040  00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 01 01 01 00 00  |................|
00000050  00 00 00 00 00 01 01 01  01 01 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000060  00 00 00 00 03 00 00 00  02 01 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000070  00 01 01 00 01 01 00 00  00 01 00 01 00 02 00 01  |................|
00000080  00 01 00 00 02 00 00 00  00 01 01 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000090  01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 02 03 01 80 06 07 00  |................|
000000a0  00 18 e5 01 00 18 e4 00  00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00  |................|
000000b0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
000000c0  00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 01 00 00 00  |................|
000000d0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
000000e0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 01 01 00 01 00  |................|
000000f0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02  01 00 00 00 00 ff 01 00  |................|
00000100  01 01 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000110  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 01 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000120  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000130  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 01 00 00 00 00 01  |................|
00000140  01 00 00 01 01 00 01 01  00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00  |................|
00000150  02 02 02 02 02 03 02 03  00 00 02 03 01 00 00 00  |................|
00000160  01 00 00 00 00 00 00 04  00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000170  00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000180  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
000001d0  00 00 01 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
000001e0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
00000210  00 00 00 00 00 00 01 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
00000220  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
*
0000027a

Now the tricky part. Since mine is 0x27a bytes long, and his is 0x27f bytes, I knew my svm bit wouldn't be at 0xf4. I know two things: mine is 6 bytes shorter, and the pattern near his svm bit was “00 01 01 00 00 00 00 00” (note the 01 01). One of the smartest options after locating all of the 01 01 instances in mine was byte 0xee. I chose this bit to flip because it was a, 2 bytes over from the 01 01 (just like his) and 5 bytes less than 0xf4. I flipped this bit, and rebooted to find out that this was actually my svm bit.

Because I was operating under a non-X environment at the time and vim was being picky, I wrote this script to flip the bit: (Be sure to change the Setup name)

#!/usr/bin/env python
#-*- coding:utf-8 -*-

import sys

fd = open('/sys/firmware/efi/efivars/Setup-a04a27f4-df00-4d42-b552-39511302113d', 'rb')
dat = fd.read()
fd.close()
datarr = list(dat)

datarr[0xee] = '\x01' # Change 0xee to the appropriate byte if not 0xee.

newdat = ''.join(datarr)
fd = open('/Setup-a04a27f4-df00-4d42-b552-39511302113d-edited','wb')
fd.write(newdat)
fd.close()
sys.exit()

Make a backup of /sys/firmware/efi/efivars/Setup-… and copy+rename /Setup-… back to /sys/firmware/efi/efivars/
and reboot.

Radeon/fglrx

I was successfully able to install the fglrx driver for this APU.

Catalyst versions 12.6, 13.1, 13.2 beta 7 on Linux versions 3.8.2 and 3.2.0 were unsuccessful, but as of Catalyst version 13.3 beta 3, I was able to get fglrx working. First trying 3.2.0, I was successfully able to install fglrx. Fortunately, Catalyst 13.3 will add support for 3.7 and 3.8 kernels. Trying with my custom kernel, I get an odd error from Xorg:

(EE) fglrx(0): V_BIOS address 0xd00 out of range
(EE) fglrx(0): Failed to obtain VBIOS from Kernel!

Trying 3.4.38 gave me the same error. Remembering that the beta release documentation talks about AGP in the kernel, and seeing that AGP is enabled in the 3.2.0 kernel, I enabled AGP,

CONFIG_AGP=y

(Not in the config.)
and all of its sub-modules in the 3.8.2 kernel. Trying again, I get no error and the “AMD Testing use only” watermark. Then seconds later, it switches to a black screen and no access to the TTYs. Progress! Then I tried completely disabling all of the sub-modules, including the AMD one, and then it worked!

Using this script from the archlinux wiki:

#!/bin/sh
DRIVER=/usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers/fglrx_drv.so
for x in $(objdump -d $DRIVER|awk '/call/&&/EnableLogo/{print "\\x"$2"\\x"$3"\\x"$4"\\x"$5"\\x"$6}'); do
 sed -i "s/$x/\x90\x90\x90\x90\x90/g" $DRIVER
done

removes the “Testing use only” watermark.

New Evaluation, Latest Model with C-70 CPU

I have recently purchased the latest model, which has a C-70 CPU, Broadcom WiFi and no Bluetooth. So far it works perfectly with openSuSE 12.3, Fedora 18, Ubuntu 13.04 (pre-release) and Linux Mint 14. It comes preloaded with Windows 8, UEFI Secure Boot and GPT partitioned disk. openSuSE and Fedora boot and install with no problem, even with Secure Boot enabled; Linux Mint requires switching the BIOS to Legacy Boot, but then installs and works as well.

Summary

The latest model, with C-70 cpu and Broadcom WiFi, works perfectly with every Linux distribution I have tried so far. I would go so far as to say that of all the laptops, notebooks and netbooks I have tried, this one works the best with Linux. Installation is easy, everything works, and it is a very nice system.


Discussion

Alan, 2013/01/26 12:39

Debian Testing : The sound card at times gives continuous beep. Goes away on reboot. Occasional. Could not determine the sequence of events causing this.

Linux mint cinnammon: Touch pad not working.

Blue tooth not working in any distro.

If we boot into windows and make the blue tooth on and then boot into linux the bluetooth works!

Brightness cannot be controlled. However fglrx driver over comes this problem. But X stops working on reboot
after hibernation on fglrx.

Enter your comment. Wiki syntax is allowed:
If you can't read the letters on the image, download this .wav file to get them read to you.
 
acer_aspire_one_725.txt · Last modified: 2013/11/29 20:51 by netblock
Contact Us Sister Sites Privacy Policy Terms of Use
Copyright © 2006-2013 Linlap.com and other authors