Installing openSUSE 11.1

Author

Bill Giannikos

Introduction

In this guide we will be providing a easy set of instructions for installing openSUSE 11.1 on your computer. This guide already assumes you have prepared your computer for Linux or alternatively have followed the guides for VMware or VirtualBox if you plan to run openSUSE as a virtual machine.

Installation Guide

Booting off the CD


After booting off the openSUSE DVD (which is covered in the guides mentioned in the introduction) you will be presented with the above screen. Push the down arrow to select the second item and press enter.

Using the Installation Wizard


After a little loading you will be presented with the openSUSE installation program as seen above. Select the language and keyboard layout which is appropriate, read the license agreement and then click Next. The installation program with now probe your system to identify its specifications.


After the probing is complete you will be presented with this Installation Mode screen. Since we are doing a new install the default options are fine so we can just click Next.


You will now be presented with the Clock and Time Zone screen. Select the region and timezone appropriate to you.

You will also have an option labeled Hardware Clock Set to UTC. This indicates whether your system clock is set to UTC time or local time. Typically if you are only going to run openSUSE on this system then select this option. If you are going to be running Windows then unselect this option.

After you have selected the options appropriate to you click Next.


You will now be presented with the Desktop Selection screen where you will have three options: GNOME, KDE 4.1 and Other. Most people will select one of the first two options with which one you choose being that of personal taste. GNOME is designed to be a simple to use interface with good default options while KDE 4.1 is more feature rich and also more “Windows” like. The Other option allows you to pick a older version of KDE as well as some other unique configurations, however most users should select one of the first two options. Select the desktop you would like to use and click Next.


You will now be presented with the Suggested Partitioning screen. openSUSE has selected a partitioning scheme suitable for most users however you may also customize this layout by selecting Create Partitioning Setup…. The Partition Based and LVM Based options allow you to select the type of partitioning used. The Partition Based scheme is easier to manage however the LVM Based scheme allows you to more easily resize partitions and also allows you to span a partition across multiple hard drives. For most people the default options selected on this screen are fine. When you are happy with the setup click Next


You will now see the Create New User screen. The first four options sets up your user account so set these details appropriate to you. The Use this password for system administrator option means that the same password will be used for the root (administrator) user. The Receive System Mail can be selected so system emails go to this user however on a desktop system this option doesn't do too much. The Automatic Login option mean the login screen will be bypassed and this user will be logged in automatically when the system is started.

You will also see a Change… button on this screen which can change the authentication method used by this system. Typically this option can be left alone.

When you are happy with the information you have entered click Next.


You will now get a run down on what the installation program will do. If you are happy with the information presented click Next.


You are now presented with this confirmation prompt, click Install.


The installation of openSUSE will now commence. This will take about 30 minutes. When the installation is complete the system will automatically be restarted and you will be presented with your new desktop screen.

Using the Online Update

Installation is almost complete but there is one very important step before being able to use openSUSE and that is to install all the required security updates.

To begin, load up the YaST program which is found in the program menus when you click on the bottom left of your screen. The location of this item varies depending on if you are running GNOME or KDE however it is in a easy to spot place in both of these.

After doing this you will be asked for the Administrator (root) password, type it in and presss Continue.


YaST will now be opened. This is your system's control center which allows you to modify many aspects of your system. Scroll down the list on your right and then click on Online Update. The update program will now load and retrieve a list of the latest updates for your system.


You will now be presented with a list of available updates. All important updates are already selected so you can just click Apply.


Some of the latest system updates will now be downloaded and installed and you will be presented with the window above. However because there was an update to the update program itself not all the latest updates have been installed. Click on OK.

At this point YaST is supposed to reload the Online Update program however this may not happen. If it does not then just click on Online Update from within YaST again. The update program will again retrieve a list of the latest updates for your system. You can now click Apply again and the rest of the system updates will be installed.

Now to complete the update process restart your computer.

Conclusion

Your openSUSE 11.1 system is now fully installed and up to date. For further guides in configuring certain parts of openSUSE please view our openSUSE Guides section.


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installing_opensuse_11.1.txt · Last modified: 2009/01/25 06:52 (external edit)
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